Understanding Scaling

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Understanding Scaling

Enzodan
I am a new user to LibreCad.   I’m learning to tool and enjoying it.
I have experience with drafting practices but the practices are old fashion, paper, ruler, t-square, pencil.

I wanted to learn more about scaling in LibreCad.    I approached the process by drawing a border on the drawing area.   I live in the US so unit will be inches.    The border is 8 x 11,  just a little smaller than A4 paper size.    The reason for the border is I want to create a template with a tittle block for all my drawings.

If I was drafting by hand I would take my ruler and determine a scale so that the object could be represented in the border area.   For example if I want to draw a box 32 x 64 inches I could use the scale 1/8=1”, so the actual size of the box on paper is 4 x 8.   That’s how I normally handle scaling when drafting by hand.  But from what  I am reading, it seems the preferred way to manage scaling in LibreCad is at print time.

I think what I need to do is keep scaling to 1.   Draw the object to the actual size and determine scale by looking at print preview to make sure object renders correctly in A4 paper size.  

With The above example I outlined, is there away to apply scale only to the object and not to the border?   Basically leave the border as is and let the tooling manage the scale for the object.
I want to set the scale at 1/8=1” and when I draw a line, I want to specify the length of 32 inches and height of 64”.   The scaling will be applied so that the object falls in the border.

Thanks
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Re: Understanding Scaling

dellus
More elaborate commercial CAD applications do have the feature you are asking for, LibreCAD doesn't.
So for your example you have to draw the border 8 times larger than the intended print size. Ditto for the text size, except dimensions text, which is determined in dimensions settings.
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Re: Understanding Scaling

Enzodan
Thank you for the response!
So I’m learning and trying to better my knowledge on user “Best practices”.

Say I want to do a floor plan of a house with a foot print if 60x100 feet.
The general scale is set to 1.

So in drawing the floor plan, I would start at some reference point and draw a rectangular box 60x100 feet.  By doing so I would need to navigate the drawing area by zooming out to see the complete footprint of the plan and then zoom in on the area that I want to modify.   Is that the preferred approach?

Thanks
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Re: Understanding Scaling

dellus
Yes, this is the preferred approach.
General Scale has an effect only at the size of dimension components like text and arrows. You can leave it set to 1. But then you have to correct (enlarge) all the values according to the intended printing scale one by one. Better set General Scale to the inverted value of the printing scale. For example if you want to get your 60x100 feet house onto an A4 or letter sheet, you will need a scale of 1/8''=1' equivalent to 1/96. So set General Scale to 96 and you can leave the other settings in Dimensions as they are out of the box (the true size on paper).
It's best to work in inches for this example. Here is a sample drawing for letter and 1/96 I once have made. You may study the settings. arch_inch_1_96_letter.dxf